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Grand Rapids Downtown Market offers summer camp for kids

Grand Rapids Downtown Market offers summer camp for kids

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.—A new generation of foodies is invited to take part in the Grand Rapids Downtown Market’s inaugural Camp Sprout July 30 through August 29.

The five-week summer camp exposes children ages 6-11 to cooking, baking, nutrition and gardening.  Activities include a visit to the greenhouse and cooking in the children’s hands-on kitchen. 

Camp Sprout will take place every Tuesday through Thursday at The Market.  Children can attend morning camp (8 a.m.- 12 p.m.) or afternoon camp (1 p.m. – 5 p.m.)  Each three-day session is $110 per child.

Program themes include:

Kent County accepting household hazardous waste

Kent County accepting household hazardous waste

Kent County will be accepting household hazardous waste from residents Saturday, July 20. 

Residents with proper ID can drop off items from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at 5068 Breton Rd. SE, Kentwood.  The county will also accept drop-off items at the following times and locations:

  • August 10: 2908 Ten Mile Rd. in Rockford
  • August 24: 1500 Scribner Ave. NW, Grand Rapids
  • September 7: 5068 Breton Rd. SE, Kentwood
  • September 21: 2350 Ivanrest SW, Grandville
  • October 12: 2908 Ten Mile Rd. in Rockford
  • October 26: 1500 Scribner Ave. NW, Grand Rapids

Chemicals including weed killers, bug sprays, antifreeze, gasoline, oil-based paint, wood preservatives, paint thinner, pool chemicals, deck cleaners, fluorescent light bulbs, mercury thermometers and thermostats will all be accepted.  Latex paint, medical waste, prescription drugs, ammunition and fireworks are prohibited.

Green roof added to once-vacant building

Green roof added to once-vacant building

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.—An environmentally friendly roof now sits over Rockford Construction’s new home in Grand Rapids.

Advanced Green Architecture (AGA) began installing the roof system July 8.  It contains 3” to 6” of soil covered with a variety of sedum plants, ornamental grasses and other perennials. 

Rockford Construction’s new offices are located at 601 First Street NW, which was once home to Miller Products before it sat vacant for many years.  The company is working to make its new facility LEED Gold certified before moving in. The newly-renovated building will feature a courtyard with green space and a deck, along with a rooftop patio.

Hazardous Waste Day for Kent County Households

Hazardous Waste Day for Kent County Households

Saturday, June 22nd, is the day to finally get rid of some household hazardous waste products that most people seem to have. So many items need to be disposed of in a safe manner and this is your chance to do just that.

Kent County Department of Public works is holding this event from 8:30am until Noon at 1500 Scribner NW, in Grand Rapids. These are items they will accept: oil based paint & thinner, fertilizers, pool & photo chemicals, bug spray & weed killer, fluorescent tubes & CFL bulbs, cleaners, fire extinguishers, gasoline, antifreeze, motor oil, mercury thermostat & thermometers and aerosol cans.

Items that will NOT be accepted: fireworks, ammunition, propane, tires, medication needles, latex paint and business & non-Kent County wastes.

For additional information, you may call, 616-336-2570 or 1-888-217-2850 or you may go on line to: www.accessKent.com/hhw

Go Green Youth Challenge: How to get fresh trees in your community

Go Green Youth Challenge:  How to get fresh trees in your community

Applications are being accepted for the Go Green Youth Challenge tree planting grants.

Children from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade are invited to participate.  Participants are challenged to collect change individually, with their class or with a club each spring.  The change will go toward community tree plantings by the Michigan Arbor Day Alliance, as well as program outreach efforts.  The team that raises the most for the Go Green Youth Challenge will be awarded with a tree planning in their community.  They also get an invitation to the state Arbor Day celebration in April at Potter Park Zoo in Lansing.

Local governments, public educational institutions, public libraries, non-profit organizations, non-profit organizations, neighborhood associations, churches and tribal governments can also apply for a Go Green youth Challenge tree planting grant by visiting this websit

River City Scholars and Oakdale Gardens Park dedicated to the community

River City Scholars and Oakdale Gardens Park dedicated to the community

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.—River City Scholars Charter Academy and Oakdale Gardens Park held a  dual ceremony on Monday, May 13, to dedicate the school and park to the surrounding community.

River City Scholars Principal Amena Moiz said, “This year is just the start of our journey as we work to build a strong foundation for River City Scholars Charter Academy to grow so we can impact the lives of thousands of children in the years to come.”

The school opened in September of 2012, serving students in young fives through fifth grade.  River City Scholars will add a grade for the next three years to offer students an elementary and middle school education in one building.

 “By providing a foundation of strong academics, values, and virtues, River City Scholars Charter Academy will inspire an attitude of life-long learning,” said Dr.

Calvin College native plant sale May 4

Calvin College native plant sale May 4

 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.—Calvin College will be holding its annual Ecosystem Preserve native plant sale this Saturday, May 4.

The sale will take place 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Bunker Interpretive Center on Calvin’s campus.  All profits from the sale will go toward education programs at the Ecosystem Preserve, allowing community members to explore the 90-acre site at little or no cost.

The native plant sale features more than 75 varieties of native wildflowers, shrubs and grasses for all growing conditions. For a complete list of plants for sale visit: www.calvin.edu/academic/eco-preserve/newsandevents .

Biology professor Dave Warners says that the plant prices will be significantly lower than what you would pay a native plant grower. He says he is keeping the costs low to encourage people to plant these native genotypes in their yards.